Ask Bob: Do I’ve to enroll for Medicare if I’ve employer-sponsored medical insurance?

question

I am 64 years old, retired and currently on my wife’s employer sponsored health plan.

My questions:

Do I have to enroll only in Medicare Part A at the age of 65 and wait until I enroll in Part B and D after they retire? Or do I have to register for parts B and D at the age of 65?

And what about Medicare Advantage and Medigap? Would I have to sign up for Medicare Advantage at the age of 65 if that’s the plan I want? The same goes for Medigap. Do I have to register at the age of 65 or can I wait for my wife to retire? Are there any penalties and enrollment dates I need to worry about?

reply

These questions are quite complex, can depend to some extent on details not included here, and the answers to one question affect the other, says Casey Schwarz, senior counsel for education and policy at Medicare Rights Center. She notes that people in this situation should seek individual assistance from organizations like Medicare Rights or a government health insurance program (SHIP) as their answers are generalized.

“If your wife is currently employed by the company that sponsors health insurance AND that employer has more than 20 employees, you can consider signing up for Part A and postponing Part B.” says black. “You need to have insurance for your or your spouse’s current job so you can sign up for Part B later without waiting for coverage and potentially paying a fine. And this current employment insurance must come from an employer with more than 20 people for this insurance to be primary. ”

“If the insurance isn’t from current job or the employer is small, you should sign up for Part A and Part B,” she adds.

If your wife’s employer-sponsored health insurance plan is from current work or retirement pensions, you can postpone Part D if the drug coverage under that plan is “creditworthy” or actuarially equivalent to the basic benefit in Part D, explains Schwarz. “Your wife’s employer should be able to provide you with this information. If coverage is not eligible, you will need to enroll in Part D or you will pay a fine if you enroll later. ”

Your schedule for Medigap and Medicare Advantage decisions will depend on when you sign up for Part A and Part B. “Your registration rights for the Federal Medigap Open begin when you are over 65 for the first time and register for Part A and Part B After the information above, you decide to wait until your wife to enroll in Part B until your wife Job leaves. At this point, you can choose a Medigap without medical underwriting. “In addition, you may also have guaranteed federal emissions protection or a country-specific open registration or guaranteed emission deadlines. In other cases, you can buy a Medigap without medical insurance if certain circumstances exist.

Schwarz adds, “You have an initial coordinated Medicare Advantage enrollment period when you first enroll in Part A and Part B, or you can use the annual fall open enrollment period to add a Medicare Advantage plan for the next year to select. “

Any questions? Get answers!

Email to Robert.Powell@maven.io.

question

I am 64 years old, retired and currently on my wife’s employer sponsored health plan.

My questions:

Do I have to enroll only in Medicare Part A at the age of 65 and wait until I enroll in Part B and D after they retire? Or do I have to register for parts B and D at the age of 65? Subscribe to the full article

Get access to our exclusive content

Learn more

Comments are closed.